If you ain’t no place you can’t go nowhere

hugo
Richard Hugo. Photo courtesy of Hugo House.

My title is from  Richard Hugo’s great book about writing, The Triggering Town.  Born in White Center, WA, Hugo reminds poets of the importance of identifying the “where” of a poem (whether actual or imagined) and how rooting creativity to place can allow the imagination to grow in unexpected ways.  As I prepare to explore our state and its poetry, I thought that it might be a good idea to visit a wonderful resource about the literature of Washington.  Dan Lamberton and The Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest have created a solid online resource for Washington writers, and I highly recommend Reading the Region, a starting place for understanding the literature–and, of course, the poetry–of our part of the world.

The Triggering Town (available at Auntie’s and other independent bookstores in our state).

 

5 thoughts on “If you ain’t no place you can’t go nowhere

  1. mcampbell6020

    Hello Tod Marshall, and congratulations on becoming Washington State’s newest Poet Laureate. We have been honored to have hosted each of the Poet Laureates (Sam Green and Kathleen Flenniken) here on Whidbey Island in past years. Will you be able to make a visit to Oak Harbor? Our library is one of the Sno-Isle Libraries, and we also share our building with Skagit Valley College. Our poetry readings are always popular and engage a wide age range.

    We’ll be welcoming three local poets here over the next few weeks: Samar Abulhassen; Tim McNulty; and Anastacia Renee Tolbert. We’d love to be able to feature you at a reading sometime this fall (or any time you will be out this way, given enough lead time). Thanks for considering.

    Best wishes,

    Mary Campbell
    Managing Librarian,
    Oak Harbor Library
    (360) 675-5115 x6020
    [Description: Description: Description: Description: Polaris]
    http://www.facebook.com/OakHarborLibrary

  2. yvonneleach2014

    Tod, thank you for recommending Dan Lamberton’s site: The Center for the Study of The Pacific Northwest. I read many of the articles and enjoyed tremendously the one about our regional writers. What a fantastic resource!

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